Hamilton Heights

The community derives its name from Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, who lived the last two years of his life in the area when it was still largely farmland; specifically, he lived in what is now known as Hamilton Grange National Monument. Hamilton Heights also comprises the well documented neighborhood Sugar Hill. The neighborhood offers several

About Hamilton Heights

  • Boundaries

    135th street- 155th street Edgecombe to Riverside

  • Nearby Subways

    1 (137,145,155)
    A (145)
    B (135,145 )
    C (135,145)
    D (145)

  • Schools and Parks

    Riverside Park, Riverbank State Park, St. Nicholas Park

The community derives its name from Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, who lived the last two years of his life in the area when it was still largely farmland; specifically, he lived in what is now known as Hamilton Grange National Monument. Hamilton Heights also comprises the well documented neighborhood Sugar Hill. The neighborhood offers several parks, including the recently built Riverbank State Park, embedded in Riverside Park which runs along the Hudson River the length of Hamilton Heights. Notable residents include Thurgood Marshall, W.E.B. Dubois, Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, and Leena Horne

 

 

Hamilton Grange House

Local Landmark

Hamilton Grange House

Hamilton Grange House on 141st street between Hamilton Terrace and Convent Avenue was home to one of our nations forefathers Alexander Hamilton and is now a national monument. He spent the last 2 years of his life in Harlem and the neighborhood Hamilton Heights was named in his honor.

Dance Theater of Harlem

Featured Vendor

Dance Theater of Harlem

Dance Theater Of Harlem is home to a classical ballet studio founded in 1969. Opened by Arthur Mitchell (the first African American member of the NYC ballet) this studio has thrived on educating children all over the city on the art of ballet.

Duke Ellington

Historical Figure

Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington and his iconic 1942 track “Take the A Train” described the excitement of traveling “uptown” on the newly created “A” express subway that ran from Brooklyn to Harlem. Arguably Harlem’s theme song of the era.